White Sand and Stone
White Sand and Stone

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Learn Mindfulness

Welcome to "Everyday Mindfulness" 

Mindfulness is a way of looking at things differently and allows a way for you to relate to all of the experiences in your life which may be causing you to suffer.  This, in turn, will allow you to personally transform yourself. We as humans are constantly looking for ways to solve the causes of our suffering and then discover how we can alleviate it. Throughout your life you can struggle emotionally when you are confronted with adverse circumstances.  When you don’t get what you want in life, if you suffer from great loss or have to deal with things you don’t want to deal with you are constantly seeking ways to feel better.

Mindfulness is meant to bring about awareness, attention, and remembering.  Awareness means becoming aware and fully enjoying and appreciating the things around you no matter how small it is.   When you are attentive, it means that you are participating in focused awareness.  That means that you are aware of what is occurring within and around you.  When you participate in this “awareness” you can begin to free yourself from mental preoccupation and difficult emotions.

Mindfulness is meant to bring about awareness, attention, and remembering.  Awareness means becoming aware and fully enjoying and appreciating the things around you no matter how small it is.   When you are attentive, it means that you are participating in focused awareness.  That means that you are aware of what is occurring within and around you.  When you participate in this “awareness” you can begin to free yourself from mental preoccupation and difficult emotions.

Session I- Introduction to Mindfulness

Session 2- Mindfulness of the Body

Session 3- Mindfulness of Emotions

Session 4- Being with What’s Difficult

Session 5- Loving Kindness & Compassion

Session 6- Mindfulness for Communication & Leadership

Session 7- Resilience

Session 8- Mindfulness for Anxiety

Session 9- Mindfulness for Work & Career

Session 10- Moving Forward Mindfully

Workbook included

Bonus: Enrollment in the 21-Day Mindfulness & Meditation CHALLENGE.

Micro Practices to Interrupt the Stress Reaction and Calm the Body and Mind

Breath

Paced Breathing: a type of Relaxation Response, Dr. Herbert Benson, Harvard physician

  • Paced breathing, like box breathing, can help calm the nervous system and the mind. It impacts the parasympathetic nervous system and tones the vagus nerve.

  • The paced breaths are slow, smooth, and deep enough to move your diaphragm — the muscular wall located beneath your lungs — as you take deeper breaths. The goal of paced breathing is to reduce the stress chemicals your brain produces and facilitate a relaxation response (Mayo Clinic)

  • The count of the breath out is equal to, or slightly longer than, the breath in. For example, breathe in through the nose to the count of 4 and breathe out through the mouth to the count of 4, 5, or 6 (like you’re blowing out a candle.) Repeat 3-5 cycles of breath anytime throughout the day or in moments of stress.

 

Body

Body Awareness

  • Scanning your attention through your body beginning with your feet, lower legs, knees, thighs, buttocks, back, the belly, chest, shoulders, arms, hands, neck, and head. Simply noticing how things are.

  • Bringing your attention to your feet on the floor if you are standing or your sitz bones if you are seated, and continue on with what you are doing.

 

Stretching

  • Doing some of the stretches from the seated yoga practice throughout the day.

Additional Practices

STOP (Jon Kabat-Zinn): Used to help calm the nervous system in stressful situations or as you go through the day

  • Stop what you are doing

  • Take a few conscious breaths and feel your feet on the floor or your sitz bones in the chair.

  • Observe what is going on inside and around you (sensations in the body, thoughts, emotions)

  • Proceed with what is next, with more connection and conscious choices

 

 

RAIN (Michelle McDonald, ~2000; Later popularized by Tara Brach): Helps direct our attention to greater clarity. Can help cut through confusion and stress.

  • Recognize what is going on for you now (note the opposite is delusion)

  • Allow the experience to be there, just as it is (opposite is resistance)

  • Investigate with kindness what it is about (opposite is obliviousness). What do I notice in my body? How is this felt in my body?

  • Nurture (Brach’s Language) with self-compassion or Natural awareness (McDonald’s Language) comes from not identifying who you are with the experience you are having (opposite is personification)

 

 

Journal Writing: This can help reveal feelings and bring more clarity to what you might be experiencing. Can be used in class after meditation practice. The invitation is to write without thinking about structure, or about anyone reading it. Possible prompts:

  • What was that meditation practice like for you? What did you notice?

  • Compassion at work is . . .

  • When you practice xyz, what do you notice in your body? Thoughts? Feelings?

Click HERE for FREE Meditation for Beginners PDF Book
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